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Death And Transfiguration

Two items of note to point out today; first up is an article by Matthew Klein in 1/12/2013 edition of The Economist which provides an overview of some of the fiscal hot spots in the field right now. Next up is an article by Zachary Lewis published in the 1/19/2013 edition of the Cleveland Plain Dealer which examines the Cleveland Orchestra’s recent growth in ticket sales for children and students.

150x150_ITA_Guy146Lewis’ article is particularly interesting because it identifies a correlation between the orchestra’s attendance growth and a decrease in ticket prices, all of which reinforces what we’ve discussed here on numerous occasions: one of the greatest barriers to attendance is price.

Hopefully, Cleveland will be able to make the subsidized lower ticket prices a permanent fixture without suffering the sort of debilitating loss in earned income revenue that helped put the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra into its current labor dispute.

If they can do that while simultaneously increasing average ticket sales and improving overall earned income, then it will be among the first organizations in the business to quantifiably demonstrate the value and impact of subsidized ticket prices.

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2 Responses to Death And Transfiguration

  1. St. Olaf Musicians (@SOmasty) January 23, 2013 at 8:50 am #

    I just have to say that the things happening in Cleveland are incredibly exciting. Students and young kids are becoming a major demographic for that orchestra which is obviously helping to bring in money now, but it also creates a strong base for the future when those college students are 25 and 30 and are still going to the orchestra. And they will take their kids there too. At least for now, it’s a really positive and community-based sustaining cycle. I wish Cleveland management was my Minnesota Orchestra management.

  2. reidmc January 23, 2013 at 9:09 am #

    “Hopefully, Cleveland will be able to make the subsidized lower ticket prices a permanent fixture without suffering the sort of debilitating loss in earned income revenue that helped put the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra into its current labor dispute.”

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